COPING WITH NATURAL DISASTERS: THE ROLE OF LOCAL HEALTH PERSONNEL AND THE COMMUNITY
( By A Working Guide (WHO - OMS, 1989) )

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Annex 4. What to do in an earthquake

When an earthquake surprises people indoors, the spontaneous reaction is often to rush outside, but be careful... If your house is built of adobe, banco, cob or similar materials, and if the street is wide enough - wider than the buildings are high - go out and make your way along the middle of the street towards a square.


If the streets are narrow, however, stay indoors and get under a doorway or into an inside corner of the room or under a table.

If your house is of concrete or steel and you are on the ground floor, go out and walk along the middle of the street towards a square.


The ground floor collapses first. The higher floors offer greater resistance.

If you live on a higher floor, remain indoors near an internal pillar.


Staircases are a weak point.

If your house is of stone, brick or the like and you are above the ground floor, do not go into the stairwells but position yourself under a doorway in a load-bearing wall.


Figure

If you are on the ground floor and the street is wide enough - wider than the buildings are high - go out and walk along the middle of the street towards a square.

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